Why Gold is Money: A Periodic Perspective

Why Gold is Money: A Periodic Perspective

July 4, 2019 By Nicholas LePan

Why Gold is Money

Gold has been used as money for millennia. People often attribute this to beauty, but there are basic physical properties for why gold is money.

The economist John Maynard Keynes famously called gold a “barbarous relic”, suggesting that its usefulness as money is an artifact of the past. In an era filled with cashless transactions and hundreds of cryptocurrencies, this statement seems truer today than in Keynes’ time.

 However, gold also possesses elemental properties that has made it an ideal metal for money throughout history.

periodic-table-gold[1].gif

Sanat Kumar, a chemical engineer from Columbia University, broke down the periodic table to show why gold has been used as a monetary metal for thousands of years. 

The Periodic Table

The periodic table organizes 118 elements in rows by increasing atomic number (periods) and columns (groups) with similar electron configurations.

Just as in today’s animation, let’s apply the process of elimination to the periodic table to see why gold is money:

Gases and Liquids

Noble gases (such as argon and helium), as well as elements such as hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine and chlorine are gaseous at room temperature and standard pressure. Meanwhile, mercury and bromine are liquids. As a form of money, these are implausible and impractical.

Lanthanides and Actinides

Next, lanthanides and actinides are both generally elements that can decay and become radioactive. If you were to carry these around in your pocket they could irradiate or poison you.

Alkali and Alkaline-Earth Metals

Alkali and alkaline earth metals are located on the left-hand side of the periodic table, and are highly reactive at standard pressure and room temperature. Some can even burst into flames.

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https://www.visualcapitalist.com/why-gold-is-money-a-periodic-perspective/